Saturday, 23 May 2009

Wild thing




I thought I'd mention a few wild plants that grow all around here and are worthy of any cultivated plant found in a garden centre.


Pictured above is Vipers Bugloss Echium vulgare, a beautiful wildflower which has cropped up just under the kitchen window. I'm going to try and collect the seed later in the year and scatter it about, see what happens.





Above is Corydalis Corydalis solida . It seeds itself around freely and its' ferny foliage and nodding flowers are a welcome sight. It loves growing along the buildings here and I'm glad it does!




Iris pseudacorus grows in the margin down by the river. Hopefully this will just continue to multiply.




This wild orchid (at least I think it is) popped up in the long grass. I don't cut an area down in the field for no other reason than it fills with crickets. I love hearing them 'sing'.




Herb Robert, Geranium robertianum grows everywhere. I'm often too hasty to weed it out when actually, it's a really pretty plant. The little pink flowers are very geranium-esque, so they're very 'flavour' of the month with me as I've got 'into' geraniums this year.




I'll not cover ferns again as I mentioned them in my last post, that aside, one thing's for sure, the garden's a better place for all the wild stuff.

22 comments:

  1. Herb Robert, Geranium robertianum grows profusely in my garden ... a love/hate relationship but easy to weed out where not wanted. Love visiting you, Rob, and though miles apart, seeing our many similar interests. Aren't we lucky!

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  2. I've only recently become more aware of Corydalis, after visiting the Open Day for the National Collection of Corydalis.

    The delicate little blooms are so lovely - I'd be very happy if it grew along the buildings here too!

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  3. Looks graceful and relaxing around there. It's really pretty and rich looking.

    I grew geraniums from seed this year--4 made it. They are about 2" tall right now. I hope something doesn't nibble them to death.

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  4. I really like the Bugloss. Herb Robert grows everywhere here. I was just noticing it today while we were out.
    It's nice when the wildflowers are so pretty and just spread themselves around like that.

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  5. I love the color of Echium. It looks especially lovely with the warm coloring of the building in your photo.

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  6. Love the white corydalis! I could use a bit of that in my garden someday.

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  7. You still have wild flowers - here they are increasingly scarce - weed killed out of existence.

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  8. You have such beautiful wildflowers! Anything tall, purple or blue is an asset -- that first one reminds me so much of larkspur.

    That orchid is really pretty. There are supposed to be wild orchids around here, but I've never seem them outside of the botanical gardens. You're very fortunate.

    Cameron

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  9. These old stone walls look so warm... And the wild orchid is amazing!

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  10. You have beautiful wildflowers that grow there - it must be a sight! I've been posting a few that grow on our road here and now all of the wild irises are blooming so I'll need to show them too.
    Thanks so much for stopping by with such wonderful comments on my bird pictures. You made my day - my sick day! ;-) I've spent the holiday weekend with a flu or something horrible.

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  11. The wild plants seem to bring nature closer to home. I can see why you want to gather seed of the Echium. The corydalis we find here tends to be really small and tiny. It's nice but most consider it a weed. I like it though, it makes you stop and look at the tiny flowers.

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  12. I enjoyed seeing your wild flowers Rob. That echium is a glorious intense blue. Here Herb Robert is the bane of my life especially those that germinate in the allotment but it is a pretty little plant. Would gladly swap your wild corydalis for mine which is the bright yellow lutea :)

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  13. Hi Rob, of course you have to allow Herb Robert. It is a new plant to me, but several blogs hav mentioned it so it now will be added to the list. The Echium is also a delight. So is the stone building! :-)
    Frances

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  14. It really is a love/ hate relationship with the Herb Robert. Once you have it, you always have it.

    I've seen Corydalis seeds for sale. Usually they're the yellow Lutea type which is sometimes called Yellow Fumitory.

    I completely forgot to mention the wild roses which pop up at the edge of the woods.

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  15. Another top notch blog, rob. Very beautiful photographs of your lovely environment. In fact we are so near to completing all our spring garden chores the idea of a weeks holiday has been floated sometime in June. Any vacancies?

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  16. How beautiful! And the added bonus of not needing the attention of the gardener, except for enjoyment!

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  17. Your comment on geraniums demonstrates how one man's weed is another man's flower. Surprised you're getting into them, though, as I thought you had a previous post where you were slightly snooty about geraniums - have you rethought this position, or am I not remembering the post exactly?

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  18. Geraniums 'R' Us for sure.

    I've been dissapointed by the quality of some I received mail order over here rather than them as a plant.

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  19. Lovely, absolutely lovely. Since moving to rural Virginia, I am slowly learning the wildflowers around here and I've even left some "weeds" that seeded my flower beds because they are so pretty.

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  20. Hi Rob

    I love the Echium I even guessed it from the close up photo it reminded me of the giant ones found at tresco Garden. Such deep blue colour. I wouldn't mind a few seeds in my garden.
    All the other lovely wild flowers are great. and everything looks good.

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  21. Herb Robert......wondered what that was. I've got bucket loads of it - literally, as I keep pulling it up! Perhaps I've been a bit hasty?!

    That white corydalis is lovely - so pretty.Might I be able to scrounge a cutting or plant when we come to see you - if I grovel nicely?!

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  22. What lovely flowers you highlighted here... I like the graceful look of the simpler types of flowers.

    The marvelous old buildings with such character are perfectly paired with the "wild things".

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