Thursday, 6 August 2009

Harry Patch



Rest in peace Harry Patch, the 'last Tommy' whose funeral has taken place today.

Harry died age 111 and spent most of his life talking of reconciliation following the horrors of World War One.

The last living link with the Great War, he was a man who talked sense. Click here for more.

7 comments:

  1. 111... he had a good long run.

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  2. To add: It is a great thing that he spoke out. My husband has patients who are still tortured by their experiences in WW II.

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  3. My Grandfather fought all the way through WW1. Dead now of course. He was wounded several times but survived and was in the ARP in WWII. An amazing generation.

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  4. One one hundred and eight year old gent survivor still going in the US I believe. Harry asked for no fuss at his funeral. Made of different stuff!

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  5. It's strange to think that the last of the WWII vets will pass away in my lifetime, and amazing to think that how long the WWI vets have been with us (and what perpective they must have on the most terrifying and inspiring century in human history!)

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  6. These men were such heroes. My grandfather fought in WW1, in the Black Watch. He was wounded by shrapnel in the leg and always walked with a stick. Never complained.

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  7. Our last Canadian WW1 vetran passed away this summer also. November 11 has a stronger signifigence now, as there needs to be some kind of bridge between new generations, there seems to be less "knowing" with all of these violent computer games. They immunize one against the real horrors of violent conflict. My husbands grandfather served in WWI and WWII and died at the age of 101 in 1994. He was born in England and moved to Saskatchewan in and around 1910 with his family. At the outbreak of WWI he felt so strongly, like many other Canadian men, of his duty to king and country that he immediately signed up. He fought in the trenches in WWI and had a few horrifying stories that he would occasionally share with his grandchildren. When I met George he was in his nineties and still very spry. He was always posative and charming, sometimes he would sing WWI french songs to me at some of the family gatherings. When WWII broke out he once again volunteered for action, this time having three daughters and a wife in Canada, when asked why he did this, he answered that he needed to see England one more time in case the worst happened. That generation had a strong sense of duty and honour that I hope can be somehow preserved and passed on to future generations.

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