Monday, 23 November 2009

Forever Green



There's practically no colour left in the garden, none at all. Three or four nights of killing frost back in October put paid to that and it seems slightly strange in this unseasonably warm November weather that the only thing blooming is some herb Robert (Geranium robertianum) down near the river.

Well at least there's always green. Above are little pots of creeping thyme, (Thymus Preacox) 'Snowdrift'. Of little culinary significance these are not a chefs choice but come spring the new growth will spill over the sides and they'll just burst with hundreds of tiny white flowers.




I think Ivy is underrated. I know it has the ability to aim for world domination when left unchecked but who can blame it for having ambition.




These triple balls of Leylandii hold their own throughout the winter. During the summer, self seeding Himalayan balsam, Impatiens balfourii spring up in the cracks along the wall. Their wild habit looks great with the formal topiary and although they're another 'ambitious' plant, it's simple enough to weed out the extras.




Asplenium trichomanes, the Maiden hair spleenwort grows in all but south facing walls and rocks. Ever present, more and more appear as the foliage behind which they once hid dissapears.





The lily of the Valley bush, Mahonia x media 'Charity' is actually just starting to form its yellow blooms though it's the foliage I really like with this plant. It's a little slow growing for me, but eventually it'll get to about three metres in height and a fine specimen it will be.




Well what can I say, the embellishment at the end of the fence, well it's green right?

27 comments:

  1. I never thought I would say anything positive about leylandii but you have changed my mind Rob :) Those clipped balls look most elegant. How many years growth is that ? No frost here yet but day after day of incessant rain :(

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  2. Fun post. We have abundant green here through the winter, but the dead grass and bare deciduous trees make everything look dreary.

    I love topiary, don't love the pruning.

    Ebony spleenwort plants itself around the garden, a native fern and a favorite.

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  3. I love the green finial. A beautiful range of greens in that paintwork! And, of course, the topiaries are pretty nifty, too. I'd never have the patience, and my garden tends to winter-burn evergreens, sadly.

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  4. For ivy, the smaller the leaf the slower it grows. At least in USA.

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

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  5. Absolutely stunning! I've been dreading the onset of winter and the coming of frosts, but you've made me feel a little better about it's arrival.

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  6. I've never seen topiary Leylandii before!! Have some in tubs, so I'll look and see what they could become. (I do actually like Leylandii!)

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  7. The green looks very fresh and happy this time of year. I love the topiary against that wall and door. I like the thyme in pots, a great idea!

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  8. Ebony Spleenwort grows wild here. It's a lovely plant.

    I should try growing thyme in a pot. I haven't had success with it in the ground.

    Beautiful fence ornament.

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  9. Hi Rob, With every post you reveal more exquisite details of your world. I love the maiden hair fern... growing in the rock wall ... the very handsome rock wall. Your Mahonia is just starting to bloom?? I love those yellow flowers. All of the pottery is gorgeous as is the lovely multi textured greenery within each one. The doors, window shutter, even the hinges are perfect. Well Done! Carol

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  10. I love the photo of the ivy in the pot under the window. The walls and stone are so attractive.

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  11. I love the Leylandii and your other bits of green - nothing wrong with green through the winter.

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  12. Hi Rob, I never tire of these views of your spot of heaven on earth. Especially when you include the stone facades, what a mix with the greens of winter that are so much more noticeable now that there is less competition from brighter colors. I have that variegated ivy too, and need to use it more for winter interest. I agree with Anna, those leylands have given me some inspiration to try a little topiary. Thanks! :-)
    frances

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  13. I really like the thyme in the pots as well as the Leylandii but what really drew my eyes was the carriage doors. Very cool!

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  14. I think you have some great Forever greens there! Ivy is one of ny favorite plants, fits in with everything and keeps the colour all year around. Your house and garden looks very interesting, I would love to se more purhaps a view?

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  15. It's all looking very lovely and fresh Rob. Everything here is looking much more .....soggy and windswept!

    Variegated ivy is vastly underrated even when we don't have a gorgeous stone wall to grow it against!

    Cheers!

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  16. Hello,

    What beautiful examples of green. However, I think the green finial is my favorite :0)

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  17. Ooh, I can't believe I've never visited your lovely blog before. You have me wistful for a lovely vacation in France! I agree that ivy can be underrated.

    Regarding your pine needles for mulch, I agree with Phillip that they're pleasing on the eye. They're also great for areas on a slight incline because they won't float away (as much as other mulches). Just be sure to pack it on. We call it 'pinestraw' over here (southern U.S.). I'll be back!

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  18. Way to stay optimistic, Rob! There's always something green and thriving - you just have to look a little harder at certain times of the year.

    I love the last picture of the finial. I'm a sucker for garden details myself.

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  19. Green is my favorite color. I love topiaries, ferns and that gorgeous pineapple!

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  20. green is good. hate those early killer frosts followed by wonderful weather. worst one here was the first week of October with 6 weeks till the nest

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  21. That is such a pretty place you've created and every season has been carefully thought out. I've not seen a Leyland so well behaved before. And we've discussed before that I love ivy too. It looks grand Rob....just so Romantic and you! Almost as good as being in NC and having muscadines.

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  22. It's like stepping into an enchanted garden.

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  23. All is thriving beautifully in your lovely 'Forever Green' garden, topiaries especially stunning, Rob. Here we have the bones of the garden to view, delightful in their own way :)

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  24. All is thriving beautifully in your lovely 'Forever Green' garden, topiaries especially stunning, Rob. Here we have the bones of the garden to view, delightful in their own way :)

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  25. I'm a big fan of ivy as well... use it in so many container plant combinations. It grows well as a ground cover here, too. Love yours spilling over the tall container with the beautiful walls as background. The three pots of thyme are a favorite as well. So simple and yet so elegant on their own. Your garden is a delight to the senses.
    Meems @ Hoe and Shovel

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  26. Hi Rob, lovely pictures!

    Rob, I've nominated you for a "best blog" award. You can pick up the image at my blog. Colleen from Blotanical nominated me and sent me the following 'rules' about the award - enjoy!

    "The rules are to post the award on your blog along with the name of the person who passed it on to you and a link to their blog. Then be sure to leave them a comment to let them know that they have been chosen. Then choose blogs which you recently discovered and you think are great and pass it on to them"

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  27. I love green! I'm planning to paint some more walls green inside after the holidays, I like it so much. There's precious little of that color around here now. Your pictures are so pretty. I especially like the maidenhair fern.

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