Sunday, 24 October 2010

Saffron Milkcap

First light yesterday morning, myself and Monsieur Chevalier - he who has dedicated his life to earthy concern - went out hunting for Cepes, that king of boletus which fetches a high price in the restaurants of Paris and London and yet, in a good year, deep in the woods of the Perigord can positively burgeon for free.

The French word for unfortunately is malheureusement, and malheureusement, a good year this is not, it's been too dry and Les Cepes were few and far between.




All was not lost however, and we departed, leaving the at best, slender pickings from under an umbrella of Chestnut and Oak and headed toute de suite for a different part of the woods populated predominately by pine, the perfect environment in which to find Lactarius deliciosus. The Saffron Milkcap. We were not dissapointed and promptly picked a good basketfull.




After bidding Monsieur Chevalier (Patrice) adieu and appreciative of the morning's bonhomie, I made my way back home thoughts turning to dinner.

23 comments:

  1. Looks like you made a good haul! Here in our part of the woods we hunt oyster mushroom, black trumpets and of course chanterelles.

    Enjoy those tasty treats!

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  2. I join Randy in applauding your efforts! Yummy photos! The light there is always so magical . . . in your images in any case. Lovely. Hope you had a delicious dinner. I have never been on a hunt such as this but do pick through the harvests of a local mushroom farmer at the farmers market. ;>)

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  3. At least you did not need fuel to walk through the woods!!!
    I am still not sure what I can eat, and what I can't, so I am very wary about searching for mushrooms. Diane

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  4. Never seen anything like them.
    But I love mushrooms and if they taste as good as they look.

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  5. Good gracious. Those are our South African pine rings! I love them! I just wrote a comment to someone on my blog about them. I adore them. I remember collecting a big basketful from a pine forest in Cape Town which fed three of us, with parsley, a little garlic, butter, and quantities of toasted baguette.

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  6. Je trouve ca merveilleux! What a wonderful adventure with spectacular results. Your friend must be quite talented with the hunting.

    We're putting thought into our trip next year. We'll have to go to France in April instead of May due to Richard's music "career" (LOL). There's just no easy flight into the Dordogne area for us. Marseille works well, so we're thinking Aix as a base for a week; then, Paris for a week.

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  7. What wonderful treasure Rob. Have been wondering how you cooked them. I am sure that must have been absolutely delicious.

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  8. Sounds perfectly yummy...would love to know how you prepared them! Carla

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  9. I hadn't heard of the Saffron Milkcap before. Love the name!

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  10. Those are gorgeous mushrooms. Wonderful photography.

    I can only imagine the bounty of a good year and the deliciousness of your dinner.

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  11. Wonderful pics wonderful mushrooms ~ I'm wondering how you cooked them.
    ~Dianne~

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  12. hi rob,

    i hope you share what you do with them in the kitchen. share a recipe or 2. gorgeous photos.

    ~janet

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  13. Sounds marvellous.Reminded me of a holiday a or two back when we stayed for a while in Rocamadour. There was a restaurent over looking the valley were dish of the day was a beautiful cepe omlette with frites and green salad.We loved every mouthful!

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  14. Have never tasted Saffron Milkcap, Rob, but looks intriguing ... so now, whatcha' cookin' to tempt us?

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  15. We in Croatia have had a very good mushroom season. Up to 300 species was to be found in the forest and fields. I love Shaffron Milcap roasted (barbeque) with a pinch of salt. There are still mushrooms to be picked like Shaggy Inkcap.

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  16. Great find! The result is good, and I know the process of mushroom hunting itself is exciting! I miss it! It used to be one of my hobbies in Russia.

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  17. Those fungi look like they belong in a fairytale! I hope your expedition had a happy ending with a delicious meal or few.

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  18. I'm too much of a wuss to go mushroom picking just in case I get it wrong but your mushrooms look wonderful and I can feel my mouth watering!
    We did once buy some wild mushrooms in Transylvania, sauted them with butter and garlic - food fit for the gods!

    Enjoy :)

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  19. Ooh, I do wish I knew how to pick mushrooms. You have a wonderful friend there to help you do so. Happily, a friend of ours brought by some golden Chanterelles last week.

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  20. That sounds like an idyllic way to spend a morning! First light is such a glorious time, especially in woods.

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  21. Rob, these look wonderful!! Now you must share a recipe made with them!

    Come and join my giveaway from Metis Linens!

    Xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  22. Oh yum! It has been ages since I had mushrooms so fresh. When we were in Germany my cousins would go out looking for some, and then bring a full basket home. Amazing what you can find if you take the time to look, and of course have the right teacher!

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