Sunday, 8 May 2011

Mediterranean Bells



I love this allium relative, Nectaroscordum siculum subsp. bulgaricum. Less of a mouthful and altogether nicer is the common name, Mediterranean bells, or Sicillian honey lily. I planted about eighty bulbs last Autumn and am really impressed with them.

Admittedly quite a few have flopped over, but those that stand look wonderful.




Not easy to photograph though. They're almost too subtle and the camera loses some of their charm. They're definitely at their best in the evening light, the candelabra of blooms are flushed almost claret, hopefully they'll seed themselves about.



The Gladiolus byzantinus have nearly finished flowering now. I reckon they're about two weeks earlier than I thought, but that's been the story of this spring, it's felt like high Summer for weeks now.

They should naturalise easily in the meadowy area by the river, it's the perfect environment for them, sun all day and free draining. If they multiply three fold in as many years I'll be happy.

16 comments:

  1. Your Mediterranean Bells mirror the colors of your shutters Rob . . . or so it seems. Very lovely!

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  2. An opportunity for climatic comparison. My few Nectaroscordum have emerged but their flowers remain spears of green. I guess two or three weeks away from flowering. Ah, the difference between western New Jersey and the Dordogne!

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  3. One of my favourites Rob and yes the common name is far more palatable. Your photos have done them justice. To continue James's comment on climatic comparison, they are almost on the point of opening here ~ sometime this week methinks. Your glads are looking good too. Sounds as if like us you have skipped spring this year. We have though had some decent rain at long last :)

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  4. The Mediterranean Bells look so charming.

    One day I'm going to get some Byzantine glads. They're reported to do well in the Southeast and their vivid color really pops.

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  5. I've only every seen those in one place, at St Nicholas Garden near Northallerton. They are very subtle, and as you say, hard to photograph, though you've captured their charm beautifully.

    I'm an Allium addict!

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  6. I planted some of those bulbs a few years ago and mine all flopped, too. They weren't in full sun, though. The only drawback was the stinky smell of the leaves, but I bet that smell makes them deer-resistant!

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  7. Don't have either, but they are lovely. Hope you've gotten rain by now.

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  8. Everything in my garden is way ahead of normal despite having had no rain for simply ages. Sadly it looks like we have lost a huge cedar tree at the bottom of the garden. It obviously does not like the drought! Diane

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  9. I've been trying to establish nectaroscordum in Los Angeles -- a meditt climate after all -- but no luck yet. I'm thinking they might need a winter chilling period. Two wonderful bulbs for naturalizing, lucky you!

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  10. All looks grand, Rob! So love visiting :)

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  11. Rob I so very much want to bring my MrD and children/wives to see you in the next two years. Your prices are reasonable and hopefully we can find good airfair. We want to come when the air is a bit light and not hot. I think you would give us such a nice vacation. I will continue to talk to you about it over the months. I love seeing all the beautiful things you post about.

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  12. Rob, It’s another wonderful rainy Spring day, so I’m taking time to look over the Blogs I follow. Wanted to see what you have been up to. Todays photos are great, and I must say I loved the ones of wysteria a few posting ago. They reminded me of my months of living in Rome. Here at Lake Michigan we will never see that kind of plant, and they are so beautiful. I;ll be checking in again soon. Jack

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  13. Love it that you planted 80 of them. Magnificent!

    Thanks for the walk through paradise.

    Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

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  14. All of it looks lovely to me!

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  15. Such lovely flowering bells, Rob. Do you know if they are good at returning the next year? The glads are perfect for a meadow planting, thanks for the idea. I have had those seed about already in just two years in the ground. Happy spring!
    Frances

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