Sunday, 19 June 2011

Viper's Bugloss



I love this plant. Echium vulgare, or Vipers bugloss blows in for free. It sets seed allover and I'm all the better for that.



I think it liked this dry spring. The flower spikes getting to four feet or more and oh, the truest blue.

I'm actually a little obsessed with blue. It ends up everywhere and in big quantities. Here (below) by the end gable I have Nepeta 'Six hills giant' - blue. Buddleja 'Lochinch' which will flower soon - blue. Perovskia 'Blue spire' - blue. And of course, Viper's bugloss - true blue.

16 comments:

  1. I think I saw this growing wild when last in Umbria--unfortunately eight years ago. Love your blues.

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  2. Perhaps you're obsessed with blue, but it obviously works beautifully in your garden! And free plants are always a nice thing

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  3. Rob,

    Here in the US there are places invaded by this plant. None nearby. In the West Virginia mountains one can find meadows full of it loaded down with butterflies of all kinds. Thanks for sharing this.

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  4. James,this plant is common over much of Europe and judging by Randy's comment parts of the US. It's up there with cow parsley as one of the lovliest natives.

    Tim, I'm not alone in appreciating blue. Apparently blue plants sell quicker than any colour at the garden centres.

    Randy, that's interesting that you have this in the states as well.

    Rosaria, self seeders frequently place themselves better than the gardener can. In posh circles we'd refer to self seeders as volunteers.

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  5. I agree Rob - a wonderful plant - and looks so good.

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  6. Rob your garden looks beautiful. The grass (Stipa?) adds just the right soft texture. I have long admired the color of Echium.

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  7. Hermes, I was watching Gardeners World on the beeb last Friday and there were pots of it for sale at the plant sale.

    Sweetbay, thanks, that's stipa tenuissima, I'm probably going to plant some stipa gigantea later this year.

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  8. I don't have such pretty blues blow in! :-) This plant is not yet on our invasive list in North Carolina. It is on the watch list. I've never even seen it.

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  9. What a glorious and intense shade of blue Rob and a flower much loved by bees, butterflies and moths. Would that I had the sunshine for them as I am most partial to blue flowers as well.

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  10. looking good..perhaps spread some more of that grass about? i am a sucker for plain old catmint..so tough and can use it just aboout anywhere in the sun..though i do not overdo it! I suppose Zauschneria http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/zauschneria-californica-mexicana would be out of the Q for you?

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  11. Freda, I really like this plant. Keep an eye out for it.

    Anna it's positively humming with insects, I think blues are always more visible, especially to bees.

    William, thanks, I've seen this plant at a few nurseries and thought it may be a species fuchsia. I reckon it would get through our winter so long as it got good drainage. Thanks for pointing it out.

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  12. I love the exuberant feel of all the plants in your photos. Idyllic!

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  13. Hi! I just had to comment on this post because I too am a little obsesses with blue flora! I don't know of this plant though, so I will look it up and see if I can grow it in my garden. If it likes dry, there is a good chance....I absolutely love your blog and photos, they never cease to amaze me!

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  14. I admired your photos and looked into locating this echium to plant. In Australia where I live it is lested as a noxious weed in many states.......what a shame.



















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