Tuesday, 17 April 2012

Morel Mushrooms



 Discreet these Spring mushrooms, but I see them, they can't hide forever.

Funnily enough, just the other day I was talking to a neighbour, Monsieur Bosquet, who pointed out that this is an exceptional year for the Morel mushroom and inquired as to whether I had seen any?
I think he was taken aback by my negative response, but at that time I'd not 'bumped' into any at all and despite having a swift look in one or two places that looked likely to yield, our paths did not cross.

Today that changed.  You have to tune in you see - focus. They're there, but not that apparent until you see one, which then enables you to see another, then another and then, before you know it, they're popping up everywhere.


I picked just a couple to photograph. If they're around at the weekend, and they may well be, I'll pick some more, an upside of decidedly down-side wet weather.

28 comments:

  1. Now if I had seen those I would have thought that they were toadstools!!!! You learn something new every day! Diane

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    1. I bet they're around where you are Diane. They pop up in the grass, particulary close to woodland though not exclusively so. They're called Morille in French.

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  2. Oooooooooooer - have never seen one of these alive or otherwise. They look like little sponges. What do you eat them with Rob?

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    1. Anna they're eaten with many things, but are really nice with chicken and a cream sauce. They are held in high regard and can be offered at eye watering prices in some restaurants!

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    2. I thought them to be most interesting looking! I have heard of ramps though I didn't know what it was, excuse my naivete.

      Alissa
      ripleyadoption.blogspot.com

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  3. Ah, a lucky sign! They grow well here in Oregon too.

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    1. I hope they are a sign of luck. Could be doing quite well if that's the case!

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  4. That top picture is so beautiful. These mushrooms sound delicious, too. Enjoy.

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    1. Thankyou. I think it's the addition of the humble dandelion that makes it.

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    2. I reckon dandelions are underrated. That grassy area must look great in autumn when the wind blows the dandelion clocks. That's if we actually go through the seasons in the right order. In S England, the weather is currently very unpredictable. Maybe your skies are more constant...

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  5. So I take it they grow out in the full sunlight, Rob? I'd imagined they would be under trees in the forest.

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    1. James, that is a part sunlight location at the edge of a wooded area. It is also damp. I've never seen them there before.

      Seeing some full sunlight would be a nice thing in this strange April weather.

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  6. Never seen these before - your suggestions sound good to me.

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    1. Thanks Hermes.

      They are one of the few mushrooms that in some opinions benefit from being dried.

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  7. Mmmm! I've only ever had dried morrels and they are lovely. I've never dared go out fungi foraging, just in case I get it wrong, but I'm sorely tempted to see if there's a course on mushroom identification somewhere round here!

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    1. Hi Liz

      I think one of those organised fungi forays is worth a punt. You must have some perfect areas to explore where you are.

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  8. Morels are by far my favorite. Fortunately, the black variety is the native morel here in the Western U.S. My favorite way to eat them is with a little ramps and shallot with béchamel on hand-made pasta.

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    1. Hello Susan

      Sounds lovely. I've read about 'ramps' - perfect for spring.

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  9. Hi Susan! I would like to invite you to the French party on Mondays. My readers would love to know you better!
    Xo
    http://lechateaudesfleurs.blogspot.com/

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  10. Lucky you!

    I found out that when foraging mushrooms in France, you can take them to a pharmacist to ensure a correct ID to avoid poisonous ones. The three American pharmacists in our family were amazed and amused at that skill!

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    1. Hi Freda

      You can take them to a pharmacy. There's is one particular chemist in Sarlat whose whole facade during Autumn is transferred into a great big 'poster' for mushroom ID. Some pharmacies are more accurate than others however.

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  11. A search image in one's mind is an amazing thing isn't it? Very helpful!

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  12. Ahhh Rob, my mouth started watering when I saw the close-up photo of the morels. Once you find one it seems like they appear everywhere. I think that is called lowering your subliminal threshold.

    I already harvested chanterelles here and expect more in a few days. Hurrah!

    Joys!

    Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

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    1. Hi Sharon, lowering my subliminal threshold it is then!

      Chanterelles, superb.

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  13. On my way over, Rob! Morels are like gold and though Michigan is noted for morels in May, I have yet to find them and pay dearly when I do! Enjoy :)

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    1. I only found them after a conversation with a neighbour. It's been wet here this April, ideal weather, so I looked and lo and behold they appeared.

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  14. Morel Mushrooms are quite difficult to spot because of their inconspicuous appearance, but from the sharp eye of a mushroom fanatic like you, there is no hiding! Haha. There are different Morel recipes you can indulge in. Crispy mushroom fry is my favorite. How about you, Rob? I’m sure you have lots in your list. =)

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