Sunday, 24 June 2012

Violette de Provence


It has to be the best named artichoke there is.  Of some culinary significance, I'm tempted to eat this one but, nah, it'll flower soon, mauve and thistly, rising out of the salvia and gaura.


It looks great with sea holly massed behind it.  In fact,  talking sea holly,


I cannot believe how steely blue eryngium planum 'Jade frost' is becoming. Soon they'll all turn, should make quite a picture!


16 comments:

  1. Gorgeous! Your garden is looking great. I'm sure the artichoke and the sea holly fascinate your guests.

    We just booked an October trip to Paris for our anniversary. Can't believe we're going back so soon! Staying in Montmartre this time.

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    1. Thanks Freda, I think the sea holly is an absolute gem although I've had to stake them following a squall around a storm which left them growing sideways.

      Paris in October should be perfect.

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  2. I've been reading your blog for several years now, probably since our 2007 trip to the Dordogne. I'm sorry I didn't comment sooner about how much I enjoy your garden photos!

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    1. Thanks Chris, I hope the 2007 trip was a memorable one.

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  3. I saw a large artichoke (Cardoon thistle) like this for the first time in a garden in the States. I found it fascinating and am going to try it next year in my garden. I like the look of the Sea Holly too.

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    1. Hi Karin, go for it, dot a few cardoon about, they look great. They're easy from seed too, though you won't get a big plant until the second year.

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  4. My artichokes were written off with the cold winter. They started to shoot and I thought they would recover not no they have gone back down under again! Your garden looks good. Diane

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    1. Hi Diane, bloody February weather. I fleeced the cardoons which I started from seed. Amazingly they came through. The artichokes I bought as small plants in March and they've not had a winter blast.

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  5. My artichokes also died this winter - 2 winters of hard snow and frost for weeks on end did them in and I've not got round to planting any new ones yet...more fool me!

    I love sea holly - note to self, must plant some more! :)

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    1. I always think of artichokes as tough, but the reality is they have origins in the Med. Grow some more Liz. I've not grown any sea holly 'till this year. I love them although had to do some staking.

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  6. I planted sea holly for the first time here in France this spring. They are just starting to show, but are not nearly as bushy as your gorgeous specimens. I'm hoping that with some care they will be spectacular. Perhaps the Chelsea chop was in order to make them fill out.

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    1. Hi Keir

      I'm sure they'll do fine, where about in France are you. I wouldn't 'chop' them though, that's to delay flowering.

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    2. Rob,

      We're in the Loir et Cher, south of Blois. We've had a pretty wet spring, so maybe I'm expecting too much in the first year in the garden.

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  7. Lovely combination of plants. They look perfect in your environment.

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    1. Hi Mary, thanks, I always associate artichokes with France or Italy.

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  8. 'Jade Frost' is a stunner. I love the combination of artichoke, gaura and salvia.

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