Sunday, 19 January 2014

Sarlat Fête de la Truffe 2014


Sarlat's fête de la truffe continues today.

Chappie on the right (a la droite) is a wiley 'ol Perigourdine fox - in the nicest of ways.
That truffle is 550 euro to you. That's not all, I've seen him back in October with armfuls of the best Cepes, plus he'll sell you the finest Charente Oysters by the dozen.


I've never seen so many truffles. Alright, well at least not for twelve months - since the last fete.






The radio people are there.


TV coverage from around the world. This is NTD TV. New Tang Dynasty Television. Chinese interest in this corner of the world continues to grow rapidly, particulary across into Bordeaux where they are the principle buyers of traditional Chateaux and wine estates.


Of course there was plenty to eat. High gastronomy indeed!











Bon weekend à tous! 

12 comments:

  1. Fantastique! Truffle week in January, wow. I guess I have to mark my calendar, I would have expected this in the fall, not now. Love your 'market' pictures with all the happy people. Hope you had something delicieux a manger.

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    1. Hi Patty. Truffle season runs December through to the end of February after the mushroom season has finished courtesy of the frost. The market was busy, all sorts of characters there and a great atmosphere plus the all pervading scent of truffle in the air. Extraordinary.

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  2. oh man I wish I had been there....the faces are marvelous....more!!

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    1. The fete is full of characters. The two guys in the last photo are like joy and sorrow - The sad expression was just a joke as I was taking photographs. I have no idea who they are.

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  3. Wow! Now I am missing France! No such markets in London, you see. I couldn't help noticing that some of the people on your pictures looked a bit grumpy. What is going on in my home country?

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    1. Maybe a little serious at times - though they were eating and someone was waving a camera in their face, ahem. The atmosphere lightened up significantly during the day, as did the wine consumption!

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  4. As always your photos catch the atmosphere and people so well Rob. What's in the copper pan in the sixth photo up from the bottom? Interesting to read that there was a Chinese tv crew there amongst others. I read a newspaper article only recently about chateaux and vineyards being bought by Chinese millionaires. I think that it would be a more attractive and pleasurable investment than buying a premier league football team. How do the French feel about this interest?

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    1. Thanks Anna. That's truffled scrambled egg in the big copper pan. Eggs have a particular affinity with la truffe, as does cheese.

      China is a large and fast growing market for Bordeaux wine - which reflects in the price though in the not so distant past Bordeaux appellations have had some pretty lean times. As to French reaction to foreign buyers snapping up chateaux etc. well, some good, some bad, though the French are happy to sell them! Often it's a good thing as it represents investment and so on.

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  5. I feel as if I was there with you. The food looks sensational, and the crowd like a typical country fair. Can I make anyone jealous about the tray of huge mangoes we just consumed here in tropical Queensland? I thought not! One day I will make it to France. Thanks for the post.

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    1. I'll happily devour a tray of mangoes. You can send some Queensland weather too, winter drags on for me.

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  6. Ye gods, is it really a year since the last fete?! Time has indeed flown this year. It's been lovely catching up on all the back posts I've missed though - and I am drooling into my keyboard over all that delicious food!

    We're thinking of camping in the Pyrennees this year...got to practice our French somewhere not too touristy! Hope you and Karen are both well? x

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    1. Time goes too quick.

      Camping in the Pyrennees would be fantastic. Dramatic scenery, just have a plan B for shelter should there be one of those mind bogglingly violent thunderstorms in the mountains.

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