Monday, 22 September 2014

Return of the Pamps


It's taken two years from from the big freeze - Le Grand Froid - for the Pampas grass to recover back to full glory.  It's all a question of scale. In  a big landscape with lots of space, their huge plumes look superb. A real September treat.


Miscanthus sinensis 'Juli' has become enormous.


Its silvery white inflorescences shine in the warm September sun.


Second year for miscanthus 'gracillimus', so nowhere near full size yet.  It's dry and free draining where I've planted it and it may struggle to achieve full size. I thought the same for 'Juli',  however it exceeded all expectation in terms of scale, so there's hope for gracillimus.


Third year for m. sinensis 'malepartus'. I reckon it'll get very big by year five. It grows by the edge of the small pond and receives more moisture.



Miscanthus zebrinus is getting swamped by super lofty Japanese anemones. Five foot tall anemones which will need better staking next year.

11 comments:

  1. Oh, your grasses are gorgeous! Takes my breath away!

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  2. Thanks Jennifer. They'll remain looking really good as this calm, autumnal sunshine continues.

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  3. How beautiful grasses are! I like pampas but it is too tall for our garden.
    I am planing to plant some grasses like Muhlenbergia capillaris.

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    1. Muhlenbergia capillaris is an absolute stunner. Pink in the Autumn.

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  4. I love tall glorious grasses in bloom....these are stunning.

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    1. Thanks Donna. I want all the miscanthus to grow to maximum size, but that's a few years away yet.

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  5. Unpleasant childhood memories of pampas grass but yours looks fabulous Rob. Just how tall is it?

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    1. What were those memories - the super sharp grassy blades? Mine must be 8 or 9 feet tall.

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  6. Pampas always brings back memories of my late (pyromanic) mother in law. Smoking 40 cigarettes a day she always had a lighter about her person and end of season pampas were never safe! Her garden was littered with blackened stumps - it's good for them she'd cry! Maybe, maybe not but beautiful. No.

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    1. Hi Sharon. I guess the cycle of burn and renewal replicates their original environment. Agreed, burnt stuble isn't the most attractive of things, the burning however is probably the best way to deal with the big beasts.

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  7. Grasses add so much movement to any garden. One can feel the "life" in places that use them. Enjoyed my visit today. Jack

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